Wine Enthusiast Takes a Look at America’s New Nouveau-Style Wines

Division Winemaking Company  founders Kate Norris and Thomas Monroe took cues from the Fête de Nouveau in Beaujolais and released its first Gamay-based nouveau wine in 2012. Gamay was a no-brainer for Norris and Monroe, thanks to their strong connection with Beaujolais, where they learn how to make wine. However, they feel that nouveau is more about the concept than variety. “It really doesn’t matter what grape you use,” says Monroe. “It’s about cause and celebration with your peers and community.”

Division Winemaking Company founders Kate Norris and Thomas Monroe took cues from the Fête de Nouveau in Beaujolais and released its first Gamay-based nouveau wine in 2012. Gamay was a no-brainer for Norris and Monroe, thanks to their strong connection with Beaujolais, where they learn how to make wine. However, they feel that nouveau is more about the concept than variety. “It really doesn’t matter what grape you use,” says Monroe. “It’s about cause and celebration with your peers and community.”

LA Times Shares How the restaurant industry is tackling its substance abuse problem

On a recent Tuesday morning, about two dozen people gathered around a long table in the old brick building that houses the Jacobsen Salt Co. in Portland, Ore. All were somehow connected to the restaurant industry: chefs, line cooks, servers, bartenders, a bouncer, a sommelier, a retired restaurateur. All were also committed to somehow staying sober.  Gabriel Rucker, whose restaurants Le Pigeon and Canard are about a mile away, read a preamble and then opened the only West Coast chapter of  Ben’s Friends , an alcoholism and addiction support group for those in the restaurant industry. Rucker talked about the stress of working over the Memorial Day weekend, and the discussion soon broadened to familiar issues of long hours, difficult kitchen situations, wage concerns and the toll the job takes on family life. The thread of not drinking or using drugs wove through the conversation like kitchen twine.

On a recent Tuesday morning, about two dozen people gathered around a long table in the old brick building that houses the Jacobsen Salt Co. in Portland, Ore. All were somehow connected to the restaurant industry: chefs, line cooks, servers, bartenders, a bouncer, a sommelier, a retired restaurateur. All were also committed to somehow staying sober.

Gabriel Rucker, whose restaurants Le Pigeon and Canard are about a mile away, read a preamble and then opened the only West Coast chapter of Ben’s Friends, an alcoholism and addiction support group for those in the restaurant industry. Rucker talked about the stress of working over the Memorial Day weekend, and the discussion soon broadened to familiar issues of long hours, difficult kitchen situations, wage concerns and the toll the job takes on family life. The thread of not drinking or using drugs wove through the conversation like kitchen twine.

Food & Wine Names Canard One of their Best Bites of 2019!

In times of war and times of peace the burger battles rage reliably on, true as the tide. The latest, greatest entrant into the discourse offers a hat tip to a lesser known style, the Connecticut steam burger, most commonly associated with White Castle sliders.  2007 F&W Best New Chef  Gabriel Rucker has dreamt up a revision of the low brow icon for his  PDX pub Canard : a griddled patty seasoned with French onion soup mix in an overcoat of American cheese, wedged between squishy halves of a sweet Hawaiian roll.

In times of war and times of peace the burger battles rage reliably on, true as the tide. The latest, greatest entrant into the discourse offers a hat tip to a lesser known style, the Connecticut steam burger, most commonly associated with White Castle sliders. 2007 F&W Best New Chef Gabriel Rucker has dreamt up a revision of the low brow icon for his PDX pub Canard: a griddled patty seasoned with French onion soup mix in an overcoat of American cheese, wedged between squishy halves of a sweet Hawaiian roll.